Fishing in Urban Houston, Texas: 4 Places You Should Check Out

Texas is famous for its warm water fishing opportunities, especially for the hallowed largemouth bass. Anglers will travel to the famous lakes of Conroe, Sam Rayburn, Lake Fork, Falcon and more for a shot at trophy-quality bass. Massive crappie, catfish, carp, and more also call Texas home, along with the dozens of popular saltwater species found in the region.

However, urban Houston and its immediate surrounding towns are not precisely world-famous for legendary fishing. People who are living or visiting in the area fear that there are not plenty of places to drop a fishing line and hook into some quality fishing, even in the urban (sometimes suburban) jungle of Houston, Texas! Just make sure to get your Texas fishing license before heading out!

Bane Park Lake

Bane Park Lake

Bane Park Lake, near the US 290 and West Little Fork Road (intersection with North Gressner) is one urban spot to get your fishing on in Houston, It is a pretty small park pond, but it offers several species to target, including your usual warm water mixture. It also receives a rainbow trout plant from the Fish and Wildlife Department. While I realize the sporting value of rainbow trout, especially for new anglers, it seems a little odd to stock them in humid, hot Houston.

McGovern Lake

McGovern Lake

McGovern Lake, near Rice University, in Houston, is another urban locale on some excellent fishing. It is a larger body of water than Bane and probably offers better fishing.

Herman Brown Park Pond

Herman Brown Park Pond, off I-10 East at Mercury Drive, is another urban locale for public fishing. It also receives a trout stocking during the year. Hopefully, not all the fish go to the birds and the anglers; I’m sure any big, smart largemouth hiding in that park pond loves a little rainbow trout snack every so often. Don’t forget to look into the many communities and semi-private corporate park ponds throughout Houston. Jump onto Google Maps and look at your area for the nearest body of water. Walk, bike, drive or jog over and find out what the access is like and if fishing is allowed. Talk to the neighbors; they may very well let you in and give you some fishing tips too!

Buffalo Bayou

Buffalo Bayou

Finally, don’t forget the Buffalo Bayou in Houston, Texas. It winds its way throughout most of the city, with public parks and walking trails all over it, making access very easy. Catfish, gar, bass, carp and more may be found all over the bayou. It generally runs pretty muddily, so use high visibility lures or stinky bait (chicken livers, etc.) here for best results.

Katy, Texas, is right outside of Houston, just a little ways west. I drove through there, doing some fishing “reconnaissance” and also talked to several locals that regularly fish the area. A quick overview from Google Maps, Google Earth or Bing Maps helps give an excellent idea of how much water there is to catch. Granted, most of the ponds are community ponds, and you will need to know someone living there to get access. However, I have met many people from Katy, and they have been happy to let me fish their local ponds. It is a friendly community, with great shopping at Academy and Bass Pro Shops, both located in this lovely city.

The lakes are known to hold lots of warm water species, especially the ever-popular largemouth bass. Also be sure to check the community of Woodlands, Texas, just north of Houston. It offers a load of ponds and small lakes, sure to please anglers looking for something outside of Houston.

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